English Language Arts, Grade 6 Module 1 -  - E-Book

English Language Arts, Grade 6 Module 1 E-Book

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Beschreibung

Paths to College and Career Jossey-Bass and PCG Education are proud to bring the Paths to College and Career English Language Arts (ELA) curriculum and professional development resources for grades 6-12 to educators across the country. Originally developed for EngageNY and written with a focus on the shifts in instructional practice and student experiences the standards require, Paths to College and Career includes daily lesson plans, guiding questions, recommended texts, scaffolding strategies and other classroom resources. Paths to College and Career is a concrete and practical ELA instructional program that engages students with compelling and complex texts. At each grade level, Paths to College and Career delivers a yearlong curriculum that develops all students' ability to read closely and engage in text-based discussions, build evidence-based claims and arguments, conduct research and write from sources, and expand their academic vocabulary. Paths to College and Career's instructional resources address the needs of all learners, including students with disabilities, English language learners, and gifted and talented students. This enhanced curriculum provides teachers with freshly designed Teacher Guides that make the curriculum more accessible and flexible, a Teacher Resource Book for each module that includes all of the materials educators need to manage instruction, and Student Journals that give students learning tools for each module and a single place to organize and document their learning. As the creators of the Paths ELA curriculum for grades 6-12, PCG Education provides a professional learning program that ensures the success of the curriculum. The program includes: * Nationally recognized professional development from an organization that has been immersed in the new standards since their inception. * Blended learning experiences for teachers and leaders that enrich and extend the learning. * A train-the-trainer program that builds capacity and provides resources and individual support for embedded leaders and coaches. Paths offers schools and districts a unique approach to ensuring college and career readiness for all students, providing state-of-the-art curriculum and state-of-the-art implementation.

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CONTENTS

Cover

Title Page

Copyright

Download the Teacher Resource Book

About PCG Education

What is Paths to College and Career?

Curriculum Maps

Grade 6 Curriculum Map

Curriculum Plan

Grade 6 Module 1: Module Overview: Myths

Grade 6 Module 1: Unit 1: Unit Overview: Building Background Knowledge

Lesson 1: Engaging the Reader

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Opening

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

Lesson 2: Engaging the Reader

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

Lesson 3: Meeting the Main Character

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Opening

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

Lesson 4: Inferring about Characters

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Opening

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

Lesson 5: Inferring about Characters

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Opening

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

Lesson 6: Vocabulary Strategies and Questions from the Text

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Opening

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

Lesson 7: Mid-Unit 1 Assessment: Making Inferences about Percy

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Opening

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

Lesson 8: The Hero's Journey, Part 1

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Opening

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

Lesson 9: Building Background Knowledge about the Hero's Journey, Part 2

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Opening

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

Lesson 10: Selecting Evidence and Partner Writing

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Opening

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

Lesson 11: Selecting Evidence

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Opening

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

Lesson 12: Writing with Evidence

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Opening

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

Lesson 13: End-of-Unit 1 Assessment

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Opening

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

Grade 6 Module 1: Unit 2: Unit Overview: Elements and Themes of Mythology in The Lightning Thief

Lesson 1: Reading Closely to Build Background Knowledge

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Opening

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

Lesson 2: Building Background Knowledge

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Opening

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

Lesson 3: Using Details to Determine Theme

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Opening

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

Lesson 4: What Makes a Myth a Myth?

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Opening

Ongoing Assessment

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

Lesson 5: Building Vocabulary

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Opening

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

Lesson 6: Connecting Literary and Informational Texts

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Opening

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

Lesson 7: Analyzing the Model Analytical Mini-Essay

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Opening

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

Lesson 8: Exploring Allusions to Myths in The Lightning Thief

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Opening

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

Lesson 9: Analyzing Details in “Prometheus” for Elements of Mythology and Theme

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Opening

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

Lesson 10: Drafting an Analytical Mini-Essay

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Opening

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

Lesson 11: Mid-Unit 2 Assessment

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Opening

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

Lesson 12: Determining Theme

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Opening

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

Lesson 13: Connecting the Theme of the Expert Group Myth to a Theme in The Lightning Thief and to Life Lessons

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Opening

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

Lesson 14: Building Writing Skills

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Opening

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

Lesson 15: Planning for Writing

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Opening

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

Lesson 16: Planning for Writing

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Opening

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

Lesson 17: Planning for Writing

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Opening

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

Lesson 18: Launching the End-of-Unit Assessment

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Opening

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

Lesson 19: Peer Critique and Pronoun Mini-Lesson

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Opening

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

Lesson 20: End-of-Unit Assessment, Part 2

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Opening

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

Grade 6 Module 1: Unit 3: Unit Overview: My Hero's Journey Narrative

Lesson 1: “The Hero's Journey”

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Opening

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

Lesson 2: “The Hero's Journey”

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Opening

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

Lesson 3: Mid-Unit Assessment and Establishing a Context for My Hero's Journey Narrative

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Opening

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

Lesson 4: Writing

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Opening

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

Lesson 5: Writing to Show, Not Tell

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Opening

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

Lesson 6: Writing

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Opening

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

Lesson 7: End-of-Unit Assessment

Long-Term Targets Addressed (Based on ELA CCSS)

Supporting Learning Targets

Ongoing Assessment

Agenda

Teaching Notes

Lesson Vocabulary

Materials

Opening

Work Time

Closing and Assessment

Homework

End User License Agreement

For ebook readers, the Teacher Resource Book and Appendix can be downloaded at: http://www.pathstocollegeandcareer.com/trbdownload

Guide

Cover

Table of Contents

Lesson 1

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Grade 6 | Module 1

Teacher Guide

Paths to College and Career

English Language Arts

Reading Closely and Writing to Learn

Cover design by Wiley

Copyright © 2015 by Public Consulting Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Published by Jossey-Bass

A Wiley Brand

One Montgomery Street, Suite 1000, San Francisco, CA 94104-4594—www.josseybass.com

No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, scanning, or otherwise, except as permitted under Section 107 or 108 of the 1976 United States Copyright Act, without either the prior written permission of the publisher, or authorization through payment of the appropriate per-copy fee to the Copyright Clearance Center, Inc., 222 Rosewood Drive, Danvers, MA 01923, 978-750-8400, fax 978-646-8600, or on the Web at www.copyright.com. Requests to the publisher for permission should be addressed to the Permissions Department, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 111 River Street, Hoboken, NJ 07030, 201-748-6011, fax 201-748-6008, or online at www.wiley.com/go/permissions.

Limit of Liability/Disclaimer of Warranty: While the publisher and author have used their best eff orts in preparing this book, they make no representations or warranties with respect to the accuracy or completeness of the contents of this book and specifi cally disclaim any implied warranties of merchantability or fi tness for a particular purpose. No warranty may be created or extended by sales representatives or written sales materials. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation. You should consult with a professional where appropriate. Neither the publisher nor author shall be liable for any loss of profi t or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages. Readers should be aware that Internet Web sites off ered as citations and/or sources for further information may have changed or disappeared between the time this was written and when it is read.

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ISBN: 978-1-119-10519-0

About PCG Education

A division of Public Consulting Group (PCG), PCG Education provides instructional and management services and technologies to schools, school districts, and state education agencies across the United States and internationally. We apply more than 30 years of management consulting expertise and extensive real-world experience as teachers and leaders to strengthen clients’ instructional practice and organizational leadership, enabling student success.

As educators engage with rigorous standards for college and career readiness, PCG Education partners with practitioners at all stages of implementation. We work with clients to build programs, practices, and processes that align with the standards. Our team of experts develops and delivers standards-based instructional resources, professional development, and technical assistance that meet the needs of all learners.

In response to a wide range of needs, PCG Education's solutions leverage one or more areas of expertise, including College and Career Readiness, MTSS/RTI, Special Programs and Diverse Learners, School and District Improvement, and Strategic Planning. PCG's technologies expedite this work by giving educators the means to gather, manage, and analyze data, including student performance information, and by facilitating blended learning approaches to professional development.

To learn more about PCG Education, visit us at www.publicconsultinggroup.com.

What is Paths to College and Career?

Paths to College and Career is a comprehensive English Language Arts (ELA) curriculum that meets the rigorous requirements and instructional shifts of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). Paths to College and Career (for grades 6–8) deeply engages middle-level students in authentic experiences while building their literacy skills and expanding their knowledge of the world around them as they grow toward college and career readiness. Paths to College and Career supports teachers’ understanding of CCSS-aligned instruction that challenges and engages all students as they read, discuss, and write about complex texts.

Materials and Resources

Curriculum maps

that provide a bird's eye view of standards, learning targets, core texts, and assessments across the year, both within each grade and across grades 6–8

Detailed plans

for curriculum modules, units, and lessons, with teacher instructional notes and student supports

Authentic literary and informational texts

at appropriate grade-level complexity work together to build students’ knowledge

Supplementary resources

including protocols and practices, graphic organizers, and supports for students with a variety of learning needs

Flexibility

, encouraging teacher adaptation and student choice

Intentional Learning Progressions

Engaging topics,

and sequencing within topics, that draw students deeply into rigorous reading, writing, and thinking

Deliberate

year long instructional processes

that develop students’ ability to read closely, analyze texts, and synthesize information across multiple texts

Scaffolded

assignments

that help all students develop skill in evidence-based writing, including argument, explanation, and narrative

Regular, consistent writing

for many purposes, both informal and more formal, incorporating the writing process

Classroom protocols

that foster rich evidence-based discussions, research, and writing based on evidence from text

Academic vocabulary

development that builds students’ ability to understand sophisticated words and complex language structures

Active learning

that encourages students’ confidence in their ability to achieve at high levels

Assessment That Informs Instruction

Daily and ongoing formative assessment opportunities

Student self-assessment and feedback

Mid-unit and end-of-unit assessments

Curriculum-embedded performance tasks for each module in which students synthesize their work to demonstrate their deep learning of skills and content

CCSS-based rubrics and models of expected student performances

Paths to College and Career provides a complete middle-level ELA curriculum, fully aligned with the Common Core standards and instructional shifts and designed to meet the needs of all students.

Why Do We Need a New and More Rigorous Curriculum?

College and Career anchor standards (CCR) establish literacy expectations for students as they graduate from high school and prepare to enter college or career paths. Grade-specific standards define end-of-year expectations and learning progressions that enable students to meet college and career readiness expectations no later than the end of high school.

The CCSS provide a vision for college- and career-ready students who can

Independently comprehend and evaluate complex texts

Construct effective arguments and convey complex information

Actively listen to, comprehend, and question a speaker

Engage in productive dialogue

Demonstrate command of standard English and use a wide-ranging vocabulary

Be self-directed learners and know how to locate information from a variety of sources

Build knowledge by engaging with works of quality and substance, reading purposefully, and listening attentively

Refine and share their knowledge through writing and speaking

Respond to the varying demands of audience, task, purpose, and discipline

Be engaged and open-minded—but discerning—readers and listeners

Cite specific evidence, connecting it through reasoning to their claim, when offering an oral or written interpretation of a text or when making their own point

Use technology and digital media strategically and capably

Understand other perspectives and cultures and communicate effectively with people of other backgrounds

Learn about a variety of periods, cultures, and worldviews by reading great classic and contemporary works of literature

Achieving these high expectations and rigorous goals requires that curriculum and instruction support teachers in preparing students for college and career.

The Standards in Action: The Instructional Shifts and Paths to College and Career

The Common Core State Standards for ELA & Literacy set clear, high expectations for what students in each grade need to know as they grow toward college and career readiness. These rigorous expectations require shifts in the content and nature of instruction so that students will achieve the standards. Paths to College and Career embodies these instructional shifts.

Shift 1: Building Knowledge through Content-Rich Nonfiction

In college and career, most required reading is nonfiction and informational text. Students need to understand the structure of text and be able to learn independently through text.

Expanding beyond fiction, students read a true

balance of literary and informational texts

.

Through carefully selected text sets, students

build knowledge

about the world (domains/content areas) through interactions with

text

rather than through teacher talk or activities.

How does Paths to College and Career help teachers and students meet Shift 1?

All modules in Paths to College and Career pair literature with rich informational text (including primary source documents and literary nonfiction). Authentic reading materials include full-length books, excerpts, articles, and other texts. In addition, each unit includes a set of sequenced, coherent progressions of learning experiences that build knowledge and understanding of major concepts related to real-world issues and concerns. Students engage in significant topics as they read high-quality literature and fiction. They build expertise on topics and share that expertise with others.

Shift 2: Reading, Writing, and Speaking Grounded in Evidence from Text

The ability to locate and use evidence is a strong indicator of success in college and career. Too often, questions and tasks ask students to answer from their own experience, rather than requiring them to respond with evidence from text. The CCSS expects that most questions and tasks require students to read the text—and to identify what is directly stated and what is inferred. In the classroom, reading, writing, and speaking all emphasize the use of evidence.

Students engage in

rich and rigorous evidence-based conversation

about text.

Writing

uses evidence from sources

to inform or make an argument.

How does Paths to College and Career help teachers and students meet Shift 2?

Each module of the Paths to College and Career curriculum focuses on reading, writing, listening, and speaking in response to high-quality texts. Paths to College and Career supports teachers with careful and deliberate sequences of text-dependent questions and tasks that ensure students return to the text for answers. Students use evidence, becoming skilled at asking and answering important text-dependent questions as they read. The curriculum also emphasizes writing from sources and research, matching the emphasis placed on these activities in the CCSS for a variety of purposes. Over the course of the academic year, students regularly write evidence-based informative/explanatory texts as they engage in text analysis. Writing instruction in Paths to College and Career frames writing as a recursive and iterative process of planning, drafting, revising, editing, and rewriting. Building the research skills outlined in the CCSS, students learn how to conduct effective, inquiry-based research. Through reading and analysis, students identify topics of interest, formulate questions for searches, assess sources, craft inquiry-based research questions, engage in research and writing, and, finally, analyze and synthesize their research in formal writing pieces.

Paths to College and Career regularly incorporates student discussion in order for students to process orally what they have read and what they will write or have already written in response to a text. Discussions take various forms, some more formal or structured than others. Discussions are student driven and share a common focus on evidence-based claims. Students engage with one another, rather than with the teacher, as they pose questions, build shared knowledge, and support each other. To facilitate classwide engagement, students work in pairs or small groups prior to whole-class discussion. These pair or small-group discussions allow students the space and time to collaboratively build evidence-based understandings of text(s) and share their ideas and understandings.

Students engage in peer-supported and independent research projects of varying lengths and on a range of topics. Using the text as the basis for forming claims and making inferences, students write in multiple contexts. End-of-module performance tasks require students to use textual evidence in authentic contexts.

Shift 3: Complex Text and Its Academic Vocabulary

There has existed a huge gap between the complexity of texts students read and the complexity of texts they need to be able to read to meet college and career expectations. The new standards have raised the overall level of text complexity, with clear expectations for independence at each grade level. One of the greatest factors in text complexity is the academic vocabulary that is more often found in text than in everyday speech. Because of this, teachers need to pay careful attention to building students’ vocabulary and helping them learn how to build their own vocabulary in a variety of ways.

Students

read appropriately complex texts for their grade level

. Instruction and learning centers on those texts. Adequate time allows students to read closely and understand the text fully.

Students

build the academic vocabulary

they need to access complex texts.

How does Paths to College and Career help teachers and students meet Shift 3?

The informational text and literature in each module meet the expected range of quantitative complexity. Students read and review texts for specific purposes. With a gradual release of support, students deconstruct, seek meaning, conduct analysis, define words in context, use and develop background knowledge, and work to understand the text at hand. The Paths to College and Career curriculum paces the learning so that students carefully read and reread complex text as they explore ideas, structures, and layers of meaning.

Paths to College and Career emphasizes depth of student understanding rather than the breadth of texts “covered.” The process of achieving this depth of understanding includes annotating text. The curriculum frequently asks students to note specific parts of a text that contain important ideas and spark connections to other texts or require additional attention and discussion.

Paths to College and Career builds students’ academic vocabulary, the words and language structures more likely to appear in complex literary and informational texts. Through guided practice, students gain familiarity with the words in context or, when appropriate, learn their meaning at point of use as they encounter the word in a text.

Other Features of Paths to College and Career That Support All the Instructional Shifts

In addition to directly addressing the instructional shifts, Paths to College and Career emphasizes instructional practices that promote achievement of high academic expectations.

Paired and Group Reading/Collaborative Work

Collaboration plays a major role in college and career readiness. The CCSS weave together the four strands of reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language to provide an integrated approach to learning. The lessons and units in Paths to College and Career allow students multiple opportunities to collaborate while reading, writing, speaking, and listening. This learning and sharing of insights also benefits students who require additional support in developing these skills.

Scaffolding to Independence

Paths to College and Career scaffolds student learning to promote independence in reading, writing, and speaking about complex texts. Each unit builds on the skills and knowledge students develop in the preceding units, just as each module in a year extends and refines students’ work in earlier modules. Over the course of the year and across grade levels, teachers will notice students’ increased capacity for independent work. As texts increase in complexity, tasks become more challenging.

Assessment in Paths to College and Career

Paths to College and Career provides a full complement of assessments, including ongoing formative assessment practices and protocols in each lesson, unit-level assessments, and a culminating performance task at the conclusion of each module.

Formative assessment practices and opportunities are embedded in and across lessons. Students self-assess against daily learning targets and receive frequent feedback from the teacher and peers.

Each unit includes two formal assessments. Mid-unit assessments typically are reading assessments requiring text-based answers. End-of-unit assessments often require using multiple sources in a written essay.

The final assessment for each module is a performance task. In these culminating projects, students synthesize and apply their learning from the module in an engaging and authentic way. Performance tasks incorporate the writing process, scaffolds for students, and peer critique and revision.

Assessments offer curriculum-embedded opportunities to practice the types of skills needed on high-stakes assessments and include multiple-item formats:

Selected response (multiple-choice questions)

Short constructed response

Extended response, either on demand or supported

Speaking and listening (discussion or oral presentation)

Formal argumentative, explanatory, and narrative essays (involving planning, drafting, and revision)

Paths to College and Career Organization and Structure

This curriculum is composed of seven grade levels (6–12). Each grade level includes four primary modules. Each module consists of up to three units, and each unit consists of a set of lesson plans.

Modules are arranged in units comprising one or more texts. The texts in each module share common elements in relation to genre, authors’ craft, text structure, or central ideas. Each unit in a module builds on the skills and knowledge students develop in the preceding unit(s). The number of lessons in a unit varies based on the length of the text(s). Each lesson is designed to span one class period but may extend beyond that time frame depending on student needs.

The standards assessed and addressed in each module specifically support the study of the module text(s), and include standards in all four domains: reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language. The modules include daily lesson assessments, mid- and end-of-unit assessments, and a culminating performance task in which students are asked to synthesize their learning across the module. The performance task also provides an option for teachers to engage students in writing or discussion of salient excerpts or ideas from the module texts in relation to outside texts, current events, the world writ large, or the human condition.

The Paths to College and Career curriculum provides a full year of modules and units, including

Year long scope and sequence

Module framing and overview

Unit-at-a-glance and week-at-a-glance guidance for the teacher

Performance tasks and other summative and formative assessments

Lesson plans

Supporting materials (class work, homework, rubrics, and so on)

Structure of a Year of Instruction

There are four modules per grade level that focus on reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language in response to high-quality texts. Each module lasts one quarter of a school year.

Structure of a Module

Each module provides eight weeks of instruction constituting three units. Each unit includes a set of sequenced, coherent progressions of learning experiences that build knowledge and understanding of major concepts. The modules sequence and scaffold content aligned to CCSS for ELA & Literacy.

Module 1

Module 2

Module 3

Module 4

Close Reading and Writing to Learn

Working with Evidence

Understanding Perspectives

Research, Decision Making, and Forming Positions

Unit 1Building Background Knowledge

Unit 1Building Background Knowledge

Unit 1Building Background Knowledge

Unit 1Building Background Knowledge

Unit 2Extended Reading and Research

Unit 2Extended Reading and Research

Unit 2Extended Reading and Research

Unit 2Extended Reading and Research

Unit 3Extended Writing

Unit 3Extended Writing

Unit 3Extended Writing

Unit 3Extended Writing

Module 1 at each grade level establishes the foundation of instructional routines used throughout the year. Individual modules culminate in an end-of-module performance task, similar to those that students will encounter on high-stakes assessments. This assessment provides information to educators on whether students in their classrooms are achieving the standards.

Modules include daily lesson plans, guiding questions, recommended texts, scaffolding strategies, and other classroom resources. Instructional resources address the needs of all learners. Ancillary resources, including graphic organizers and collaborative protocols and formative assessment practices, apply to all modules.

Paths to College and Career is planned and developed according to the principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) to support

English Language Learners (ELL)

Students with Disabilities (SWD)

Accelerated learners

Students achieving and performing below grade level

Each module is designed to be adapted to a group's specific instructional needs. Lessons are not scripts, but are intended to illustrate how instruction might be sequenced. Lessons are adaptable and allow for teacher preference and flexibility both to meet students’ needs and to meet the requirements of the shifts and the standards.

Using Paths to College and Career

Paths to College and Career provides strong and engaging instruction and learning experiences in each lesson, throughout each unit and module, and across all grade levels. Students develop expertise in the standards as they practice them with a variety of topics and tasks. The routines and protocols are consistent throughout the lessons, units, and modules, and across grade levels. This predictable structure provides scaffolds for students as they grow toward independence and accountability for their own learning.

Launching a Module

Paths to College and Career provides multiple supports in each module to facilitate instructional planning.

The Module Overview provides a road map of the entire module, and includes the module's guiding questions and big ideas, a description of the final performance task, key features of the central texts, the standards addressed and assessed in the module, and long-term “I can” statements that translate the standards into student-centered targets.

The Week-at-a-Glance Calendar adds detail to the description provided in the Module Overview, including the instructional focus and a brief description of assessments.

A detailed description in the Module Assessments section, including the performance task, further clarifies the trajectory of instruction and the specific skills in context that students will understand by the end of the module.

The Recommended Texts chart explains the Lexile (quantitative complexity) measure and text type of each literary and nonfiction work in the module.

These overview documents provide a panoramic view of the module and include the information educators need to make decisions about adapting, enhancing, or changing learning activities.

Teaching a Unit

The Unit Overview includes the learning targets and standards addressed in this unit, the texts used in this unit, and a lesson-by-lesson overview. Especially helpful at this level of detail are the lesson-level (supporting) learning targets derived from the long-term targets for the module. “Anchor Charts and Protocols” identifies the introduced and reinforced routines in each lesson.

Inside the Lesson

Each lesson, regardless of the topic or timing within the unit, module, or year, has a dependable structure.

The lesson Opening engages students in the work of the lesson and reviews learning targets for the day. The lesson opening builds on the work of the prior lesson.

Work Time comprises the bulk of the lesson and may include close reading, note taking, journaling, teacher modeling, vocabulary development, and partner or group work. As students prepare for a mid-unit or end-of-unit assessment, work time may give them an opportunity to plan, draft, revise, and peer- or self-assess. Work Time varies from day to day according to the learning targets, texts, and tasks.

Closing and Assessment includes a debrief of the lesson and homework instructions. In lessons that do not include a specific assessment, there is a brief formative assessment, such as an “Exit Ticket.”

Support for the Teacher

In addition to information provided in the module and unit overviews, support is provided throughout the lesson in sections labeled Teaching Notes and Meeting Students’ Needs, as well as in the supporting materials.

Teaching Notes describe protocols used in the lesson, and ongoing practices, such as journaling. They also suggest how to prepare for the lesson. The Teaching Notes also include background information that explains how a concept or routine introduced in this lesson will connect to or build toward other lessons.

Meeting Students’ Needs discusses the purpose of particular protocols in the lesson and suggestions for visuals, tools, practices, models, or adaptations for students who may need extra support to achieve lesson goals.

Supporting Materials comprise those materials that might be required for the lesson. These materials may include specific reproducible maps, articles, and graphic organizers. The Supporting Materials are all collected in the Teacher Resource Book that accompanies each module. For ebook readers, the Teacher Resource Book and Appendix files can be downloaded at http://www.pathstocollegeandcareer.com/trbdownload

Paths to College and Career is truly a complete and integrated English Language Arts curriculum that ensures teaching and learning to the letter and in the spirit of the new standards and the related instructional shifts.

Curriculum Maps

These grades 6–8 curriculum modules are designed to address CCSS ELA outcomes during a 45-minute English Language Arts block. The overarching focus for all modules is on building students’ literacy skills as they develop knowledge about the world.

Taken as a whole, these modules are designed to give teachers concrete strategies to address the “instructional shifts” required by the CCSS.

Structure of a Module

Each module provides eight weeks of instruction, broken into three shorter units. Each module includes seven assessments:

Six unit-level assessments that are almost always on-demand: students’ independent work on a reading, writing, speaking, or listening task

One final performance task that is a more supported project, often involving research

Structure of a Year of Instruction

There are four modules per grade level: Module 1, followed by Module 2, Module 3, then Module 4. Teachers should begin the year with Module 1, which lays the foundation for both teachers and students regarding instructional routines.

How to Read the Curriculum Maps

The purpose of the curriculum map is to provide a high-level summary of each module and name the standards formally assessed in each module.

Module Focus: Read this first. The “focus” is the same across the grades 6–8 band and signals the progression of literacy skills across the year as well as alignment to the CCSS instructional shifts.

Module Title: This signals the topic students will be learning about (often connected to social studies or science) and aligns with Instructional Shift #1, building knowledge through content-rich nonfiction.

Description: These three or four sentences tell the basic “story” of the eight-week arc of instruction: the literacy skills, content knowledge, and central text(s).

Texts: This lists texts that all students read. The texts in bold are the extended texts for a given module: the texts with which students spend the most time. Remember that texts can be complex based on both qualitative and quantitative measures. Texts are listed in order from most quantitatively complex (based on Lexile® measure) to least quantitatively complex. Texts near the bottom of the list are often complex in ways other than Lexile. Within a given module, the list shows the wide variety of texts students read as they build knowledge about a topic. This aligns with Instructional Shift #1, building knowledge through content-rich nonfiction.

Final Performance Task: This is a culminating project, which takes place during Unit 3 of every module. Performance tasks are designed to help students synthesize and apply their learning from the module in an engaging and authentic way. Performance tasks are developed using the writing process, are scaffolded, and almost always include peer critique and revision. Performance tasks are not “on-demand” assessments. (Note: The End-of-Unit 3 Assessment often addresses key components of the performance task.)

Unit-Level Assessments:

Each unit includes two assessments, most of which are “on-demand” (that is, show what you know/can do on your own).

Mid-Unit Assessments typically, though not always, are reading assessments: text-based answers.

End-of-Unit Assessments typically, though not always, are writing assessments: writing from sources.

Most assessments have a heavy emphasis on academic vocabulary, particularly on determining words in context.

Assessments are designed to be curriculum-embedded opportunities to practice the types of skills needed on state assessments.

The curriculum map that follows lists the title of each assessment, the standards assessed, and the assessment format, of which there are five types.

Selected response (multiple-choice questions)

Short constructed response (short-answer questions of the type that is scored using a 2-point rubric)

Extended response (longer writing or essays of the type that is scored using a 4-point rubric) (either on-demand or supported)

Speaking and listening (discussion or oral presentation)

Scaffolded essay (involving planning, drafting, and revision)

Standards: In each module, the standards formally assessed are indicated with a check mark.

Grade 6 Curriculum Map

Module 1

Module 2

Module 3

Module 4

Focus

Reading Closely and Writing to Learn

Working with Evidence

Understanding Perspectives

Reading for Research and Writing an Argument

Module Title

Myths: Not Just Long Ago

Rules to Live By

The Land of the Golden Mountain

Insecticides: Costs versus Benefits

Description

Students study the purposes and elements of mythology. Students read Rick Riordan's

The Lightning Thief

with a focus on the archetypal hero's journey and close reading of the many mythical allusions. They also read complex informational texts about the elements of mythology.As a whole class, students will closely read several complex Greek myths and then work in small groups to build expertise on an additional myth. Students then develop their narrative writing skills as they create their own hero's journey narrative.

How do people formulate and use “rules” to improve their lives and communicate these rules to others? Students consider these questions as they read a variety of texts. They begin with

Bud, Not Buddy

, analyzing character development and considering how fi gurative language contributes to tone and meaning. They then read closely Steve Jobs's speech (focusing on how Jobs develops his ideas at the paragraph, sentence, and word levels) and analyze the poem “If” to compare and contrast how the novel and the poem address a similar theme. In an argument essay, students establish a claim about how Bud uses his rules. Finally, students conduct a short research project related to their own “rules to live by” and then write an essay to inform about one important rule to live by.

Students study how an author develops point of view and how an author's perspective, based on his or her culture, is evident in the writing. As students read Laurence Yep's

Dragonwings

, they analyze how Yep has developed the point of view of the narrator, Moon Shadow. They also read excerpts of Yep's biography The

Lost Garden

to determine how his culture and experiences have shaped his perspective as evidenced in the novel. They read accounts by people from the turn of the century in San Francisco, analyzing perspective and comparing the accounts to those in the novel. Finally, students write newspaper articles that convey multiple perspectives about life for Chinese immigrants in San Francisco in the early 1900s.

Students consider the balance between human needs and environmental consequences as they read the novel

Frightful's Mountain

and complex informational texts about the benefits and drawbacks of the use of DDT. They learn how to trace and evaluate an argument in written texts and videos on this topic, and conduct both supported and independent research. Through structured discussions and decisionmaking protocols, students form their own argument about the use of DDT. Students then apply their research to write a position paper in which they support that claim with evidence.

Texts (central texts in bold)

*

“The Fates,” based on E. M. Berens (RL, 1230L)

“The Story of Medusa and Athena,” Leanne Guenther (RL, 1200L)

“Cronus,” based on E. M. Berens (RL, 980L)

“Myths and Legends,” based on E. M. Berens (RI, 1150L)

“Shrouded in Myth,” Jessica Fisher Neidl (RI, 1100L)

Key Elements of Mythology,

” Expeditionary Learning (RI, 1080L)

The Hero's Journey

,” Expeditionary Learning (RI, 865L)

“Prometheus and Pandora,” based on Jean Lang (RL, 920L)

“Theseus and the Minotaur,” based on Nathaniel Hawthorne (RL, 920L)

The Lightning Thief

, Rick Riordan (RL, 740L)

The Golden Key, Expeditionary Learning (RL, 665L)

D'Aulaires Book of Greek Myths

, Ingri and Edgar Parin D'Aulaire (teacher copy only)

Bud, Not Buddy

, Christopher Paul Curtis (RL, 950L)

If

,” Rudyard Kipling (RL, Poem, NL) (also audio version:

http://archive.org/details/if_kipling_librivox

)

“Health Rocks,”

Skipping Stones

(RI, 1540L)

“Adults Cut Back Fast Food, but U.S. Kids Still Eat Too Much Fat: CDC,” Susan Heavey (RI, 1430L)

“The Life of a Cell Phone,” U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (RI, 1300L)

“Recipe for Health,” Emily Sohn (RI, 1090L)

“Live by Design, Not Default,”

Skipping Stones

(RI, 1080L)

“Earth Day, Your Way: Celebrate Earth Day, April 22,”

Current Health 1

(RI, 970L)

“Back-to-School Speech,” President Barack Obama (RI, 940L)

“Bullies behind Bars?” Carmen Morais (RI, 930L)

“Make Your Move,” Jennifer Marino-Walters (RI, 890L)

Stanford University Commencement Address

,” Steve Jobs (RI, 865L)

“Is the Cafeteria Ruining Your Life?” Elizabeth Larson and Justin O'Neill (RI, 830L)

“A Skateboarder Goes Green,” Blair Rainsford (RI, 790L)

“Cyber Bullying Statistics,”

www.bullyingstatistics.org

(RI, NL)

“Waking Up in a Nightmare,” Expeditionary Learning (RL, 1010L)

Dragonwings

, Laurence Yep (RL, 870L)

“Poem of the Earthquake,” Eliza Pittsinger (RL, Poem)

“Scene 1: The Great Earthquake and Fires of 1906: A Dramatic Remembrance,” Expeditionary Learning (RL, Play)

“The San Francisco Earthquake, 1906,” Eyewitness to History (RI, NL)

“The Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake,”

USGS.gov

(RI, 1500L)

“Sandy Wreaks Havoc across Northeast; at Least 11 Dead,” Matt Smith (RI, 1400L)

“One Boy's Experience,” Lloyd Head (RI, 1270L)

“Timeline of the San Francisco Earthquake, April 18–23, 1906,” Gladys Hansen (RI, 1150L)

The Lost Garden

, Laurence Yep (RI, 1020L)

Comprehending the Calamity

,” Emma Burke (RI, 1060L)

“Casualties and Damage after the 1906 Earthquake,”

USGS.gov

(RI, 730L)

Frightful's Mountain

, Jean Craighead George (RL, 650L)

“Biological Energy—Here, Let Me Fix It!” Utah Education Network (RI, NL)

“A New Home for DDT,” Donald Roberts (RI, 1200L)

“Malaria Carrying Mosquito Crash Lands Due to His Insecticide,” Adam Allie (RI, 1150L)

The Exterminator

,” Kirsten Weir (RI, 1140L)

“Welcome Back,” Susan Nagle-Schwarz (RI, 1080L)

“How DDT Harmed Hawks and Eagles,” Gil Valo (RI, 1020L)

“Rachel Carson: Environmentalist and Writer,” Kathy Wilmore (RI, 840L)

“Rachel Carson: Sounding the Alarm on Pollution,” Robert Peterson (RI, 840L)

John Stossel Video on DDT:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kHwqandRTSQ

“Earth Tones” Video on DDT:

http://www.science.gc.ca/default.asp?lang=en&n=730d78b4-1

Performance Task

“My Hero's Journey” Narrative (RL.6.3, W.6.3, W.6.4, W.6.5, W.6.6, L.6.2, and L.6.3) scaff olded narrative

Essay to Inform: “My Rule to Live By” (RI.6.1, RI.6.2, W.6.2, W.6.4, W.6.5, W.6.9, W.6.9.b, L.6.1, and L.6.2) scaff olded essay

Newspaper Article: “How the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake and Fire Aff ected the People of San Francisco” (RI.6.7, W.6.2, W.6.4, W.6.9, W.6.9.b, and L.6.3) scaff olded essay

Scientific Poster and Hosted Gallery Walk (RI.6.1, W.6.1, W.6.4, W.6.5, and L.6.6) research paper

Lexile®

Common Core band level text diffi culty ranges for grades 6–8

**

: 925–1185L

*

Texts listed in order of informational text fi rst, then literature; both categories shown from most to least quantitatively complex (based on Lexile®).

**

Supplemental Information for Appendix A of the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy: New Research on Text Complexity

http://www.corestandards.org/assets/E0813_Appendix_A_New_Research_on_Text_Complexity.pdf

.

Unit-Level Assessments (ELA CCSS)

Module 1

Module 2

Module 3

Module 4

Mid-Unit 1

Inferring about the Main Character in

The Lightning Thief

(RL.6.1 and RL.6.3) graphic organizer and short constructed responses

Figurative Language and Word Choice in

Bud, Not Buddy

(RL.6.4 and L.6.5) short constructed response

Point of View, Figurative Language and Passage Connections from Dragonwings (RL.6.4, RL.6.5, RL.6.6, and L.6.4.a) graphic organizer and short constructed response

Tracing and Evaluating an Argument: “Rachel Carson: Sounding the Alarm on Pollution” and the Video about DDT (RI.6.8 and SL.6.3) graphic organizers

End-of-Unit 1

Drawing Evidence from Text: Written Analysis of How Percy's Experiences Align with “The Hero's Journey” (RL.6.1, RL.6.3, R.I. 6.1, W.6.9, and W.6.9.b) graphic organizer and short constructed response

Analyzing the Barack Obama Back-to-School Speech (RI.6.2 and RI.6.5) short constructed response

Evidence of Author's Perspective in Dragonwings (RL.6.4 and RL.6.6) short constructed response

Fishbowl Discussion: DDT: Do the Benefi ts Outweigh the Consequences? (SL.6.2) discussion

Mid-Unit 2

Analytical Mini-Essay about Elements and Theme of the Myth of Prometheus (RL.6.1, RL.6.2, RI.6.1, W.6.2, and W.6.9) scaff olded essay

Analyzing Poetry: Structure and Theme in Stanza 4 of “If” by Rudyard Kipling (RL.6.5, RL.6.7, RL.6.9, and L.6.5) reading and listening task; selected response, short constructed response

Short Response: Analyzing the Point of View: Relief Camps (RI.6.3, RI.6.6, and RI.6.4) short constructed response

Comparing and Contrasting Two Texts: Simulated Research (RI.6.9, W.6.7, W.6.8, L.6.4, and L.6.4.b-d) graphic organizer, selected response, short constructed response

End-of-Unit 2

Literary Analysis—Connecting Themes in “Cronus” and The Lightning Thief (RL.6.1, RL.6.2, W.6.2, W.6.5, W.6.9, W.6.9.a, and L.6.1.a-d) scaff olded essay

“How Does Bud Use His Rules: To Survive or to Thrive?” Argument Essay (RL.6.1, RL.6.2, W.6.1, W.6.4, and W.6.9) scaff olded essay

Literary Analysis: How Do the Author's Purposes Aff ect the Narrator's Points of View? (W.6.2, W.6.9, W.6.9.a, and L.6.2) scaff olded essay

Making a Claim: Where Do You Stand on the Use of DDT? (RI.6.9, W.6.1, W.6.9, SL.6.4, SL.6.5, and SL.6.6) oral presentation

Mid-Unit 3

Crosswalk between “My Hero's Journey” Narrative and “The Hero's Journey” Informational Text (W.6.2, W.6.3.a, and W.6.9) on-demand extended response

Discussion Skills, Summarizing Informational Text, and Choosing Best Evidence: Supporting a Claim in an Essay to Inform (RI.6.1, RI.6.2, and SL.6.1) short constructed response and discussion

Part 1: Researching and Interpreting Information: Researching How the Destruction Caused by the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake and Fire Aff ected the People of San Francisco Part 2: Explaining How New Information Connects to the Topic (W.6.7 and SL.6.2) graphic organizer and oral explanations

Draft of Position Paper: “DDT: Do the Benefi ts Outweigh the Consequences?” (RI.6.1, W.6.1, W.6.9, and W.6.9.b) draft essay

End-of-Unit 3

“My Hero's Journey” Narrative Draft (W.6.3 and W.6.4) on-demand narrative

Draft of Essay to Inform: “My Rule to Live By” (RI.6.1, RI.6.2, W.6.2, W.6.4, and W.6.9) on-demand essay

Draft Newspaper Article: “How the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake and Fire Aff ected the People of San Francisco” (RI.6.7, W.6.2, W.6.4, and W.6.9) scaff olded essay

Refl ection on the Writing Process: Moving from Draft to Published Position Paper (W.6.5, W.6.6, L.6.1.e, and L.6.6) written refl ection

Common Core ELA Standards Formally Assessed, by Module

In the following tables, any specific CCSS with a check mark indicates that the standard is formally assessed.

Some standards are formally assessed in multiple modules.

Because of the integrated nature of the standards, even standards that are not formally assessed are often embedded in instruction throughout every module (for example, RI/RL.6.1).

Some standards are not applicable in an on-demand assessment context (for example, R.6.10 or W.6.10). In the following tables, these standards are noted as “integrated throughout.”

Some standards (for example, W.6.2) have a main or “parent” standard and then subcomponents (for example, W.6.2.a). Often, students’ mastery of the entirety of this standard is scaffolded across multiple modules. Therefore, in the following tables, the “parent” standard is checked only if

all

components of that standard are formally assessed within that particular module. Otherwise, just the specific components are checked.

Reading Standards for Literature

Module 1

Module 2

Module 3

Module 4

RL.6.1. Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RL.6.2. Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments.

RL.6.3. Describe how a particular story's or drama's plot unfolds in a series of episodes as well as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves toward a resolution.

RL.6.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

RL.6.5. Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene, or stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot.

RL.6.6. Explain how an author develops the point of view of the narrator or speaker in a text.

RL.6.7. Compare and contrast the experience of reading a story, drama, or poem to listening to or viewing an audio, video, or live version of the text, including contrasting what they “see” and “hear” when reading the text to what they perceive when they listen or watch.

RL.6.9. Compare and contrast texts in different forms or genres (e.g., stories and poems; historical novels and fantasy stories) in terms of their approaches to similar themes and topics.

RL.6.10. By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6–8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

Integrated throughout.

Reading Standards for Informational Text

Module 1

Module 2

Module 3

Module 4

RI.6.1. Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RI.6.2. Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments.

RI.6.3. Analyze in detail how a key individual, event, or idea is introduced, illustrated, and elaborated in a text (e.g., through examples or anecdotes).

RI.6.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings.

RI.6.5. Analyze how a particular sentence, paragraph, chapter, or section fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the ideas.

RI.6.6. Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and explain how it is conveyed in the text.

RI.6.7. Integrate information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words to develop a coherent understanding of a topic or issue.

RI.6.8. Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, distinguishing claims that are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not.

RI.6.9. Compare and contrast one author's presentation of events with that of another (e.g., a memoir written by and a biography on the same person).

RI.6.10. By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 6–8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

Integrated throughout.

Writing Standards

Module 1

Module 2

Module 3

Module 4

W.6.1. Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.

Introduce claim(s) and organize the reasons and evidence clearly.

Support claim(s) with clear reasons and relevant evidence, using credible sources and demonstrating an understanding of the topic or text.

Use words, phrases, and clauses to clarify the relationships among claim(s) and reasons.

Establish and maintain a formal style.

Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from the argument presented.

W.6.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.

Introduce a topic; organize ideas, concepts, and information, using strategies such as definition, classifi cation, comparison/contrast, and cause/effect; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

Develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples.

Use appropriate transitions to clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts.

Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.

Establish and maintain a formal style.

Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from the information or explanation presented.

W.6.3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using eff ective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.

Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.

Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another.

Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to convey experiences and events.

Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events.

W.6.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

W.6.5. With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

Integrated throughout.

W.6.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate suffi cient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of three pages in a single sitting.

Integrated throughout.

W.6.7. Conduct short research projects to answer a question, drawing on several sources and refocusing the inquiry when appropriate.

W.6.8. Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources; assess the credibility of each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and providing basic bibliographic information for sources.

W.6.9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, refl ection, and research.

Apply

grade 6 Reading standards

to literature (e.g., “Compare and contrast texts in diff erent forms or genres [e.g., stories and poems; historical novels and fantasy stories] in terms of their approaches to similar themes and topics”).

Apply

grade 6 Reading standards

to literary nonfi ction (e.g., “Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, distinguishing claims that are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not”).