Pocket guide to the Professional Scrum Master Certification  (PSM 1) - Markus Marfurt - E-Book

Pocket guide to the Professional Scrum Master Certification (PSM 1) E-Book

Markus Marfurt

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Beschreibung

The Professional Scrum Master Training of the Scrum.org is for many people the first step of a certification in the context of Scrum and agile development approaches. This certification documents like no other a deep understanding of Scrum as it is presented in the Scrum Guide. As simple and clear as these Scrum basics are described, it is however difficult for many people to put the principles and ideas presented therein into practice. This is a challenge both in their daily work and in passing the PSM certification exam. Marcus Marfurt, himself a Scrum Master and trainer for a long time, shows the transfer from the Scrum Guide to the practice of a Scrum Master's activity. The knowledge imparted is an optimal preparation for the Scrum Master certification exam.

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Seitenzahl: 40

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All information contained in this book has been presented to the best of our knowledge and belief and has been checked several times. Nevertheless, there is always a residual risk that either an error has crept in. Neither the author nor the publisher can be held liable for this.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

SCRUM AND AGILE

AGILE

PSM 1 CERTIFICATE AND TESTING

Procedure of the test

AUDIT STRATEGY

Concentrated preparation

Focus during the test

Preparing documents

Read questions completely

Schedule two rounds

Skip questions - but not completely

Keep an eye on the time

Use documents that are tailored to Scrum or recommended by Scrum.org

Knowledge required to pass the exam

Empirism - Empirical basis

THE THREE PILLARS OF EMPIRICAL PROCESS CONTROL

Transparency

Inspection

Adaptation

THE VALUES OF SCRUM

Courage (Courage)

Focus

Commitment

Respect

Openness

THE SCRUM TEAM

The Product Owner

The Scrum Master

The Development Team

SCRUM EVENTS

Sprint

Sprint Planning

Approach to successful Sprint Planning

Daily Scrum

Sprint Review

Sprint Retrospective

SCRUM ARTIFACTS

Scrum Artifacts

product backlog

Sprint Backlog

product increase

IMPORTANT SCRUM TERMS

Product Backlog Refinement

Time Box

Definition of Done

Sprint Goal (optional element)

Burn Down Chart

TO THE CONCLUSION

SCRUM AND AGILE

In most cases, project management is based on the waterfall model (or a comparable approach). This means that before the start of the project or at the beginning of the project, a plan is drawn up for the entire implementation as complete as possible. All conceivable obstacles are taken into account and possible risks are minimized as far as possible. As soon as the project plan is completely prepared, the implementation can begin. In this context, the goal is that the project result predominantly corresponds to what was specified in the underlying planning and the associated requirements documents. The customer (whether internal or external) receives the developed product at the end.

It is an everyday experience that this development approach is associated with considerable risks, especially in the case of projects of longer duration or those with a higher degree of complexity. On the one hand, there is always a certain basic risk as to whether what was originally specified corresponds to what is really needed. Furthermore, there is a risk that the team that has to implement a requirement may understand it in a completely different way than what the client intended. Other challenges include the fact that requirements can change during the course of the project (because the customer needs something else or because certain conditions have changed).

The major weakness of such a development approach is that the customer's involvement during the development period is very low. His knowledge and expertise as a future user are hardly integrated.

Scrum has a completely different approach here. The framework, developed by Ken Schwaber and Jeff Sutherland and first presented at the OOPSLA conference in 1995, is based on constant interaction with the customer and his feedback. Since it is based on the exchange and gain of experience through this feedback, it is also called empirical1.

The advantages of such an approach are risk and cost reduction.

AGILE

Agile is based on the Agile Manifesto, which can be found at (www.agilemanifest.org).

Manifesto for Agile Software Development

We are uncovering better ways of developing

software by doing it and helping others do it.

Through this work we have come to value:

Individuals and interactions over processes and tools

Working software over comprehensive documentation

Customer collaboration over contract negotiation

Responding to change over following a plan

That is, while there is value in the items on

the right, we value the items on the left more.

Kent Beck

Mike Beedle

Arie van Bennekum

Alistair Cockburn

Ward Cunningham

Martin Fowler

James Grenning

Jim Highsmith

Andrew Hunt

Ron Jeffries

Jon Kern

Brian Marick

Robert C. Martin

Steve Mellor

Ken Schwaber

Jeff Sutherland

Dave Thomas

The goal was to establish a better way for software development and to define values and principles for it.

The Manifesto, which was published in 2001, was influenced by Scrum among other things, which is also shown by the fact that the two developers of Scrum are also among the first signatories of the Manifesto. Agile is more a philosophy than a method or framework, as is the case with Scrum.

PSM 1 CERTIFICATE AND TESTING