Office 2016 For Seniors For Dummies - Faithe Wempen - E-Book

Office 2016 For Seniors For Dummies E-Book

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Keep up with the latest Office technologies, and learn the fundamentals of Microsoft Office 2016! Office 2016 For Seniors For Dummies is the ideal resource for learning the fundamentals of the Microsoft Office suite. You'll explore the functionality of Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook, establishing basic knowledge that you can build upon as you continue to experiment with Office's applications. Larger font and image sizes mean you can easily read the content--and text that gets back to basics walks you through everything you need to know to use these programs in a variety of environments. Whether you want to improve your Microsoft Office skills to stay competitive at work or to finally write that novel you've had simmering in your head for the last ten years, this is the resource you need to get started! * Access clear-cut, easy-to-read steps that show you how to get the most out of Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook * Learn the fundamentals of Microsoft Office 2016 -starting with the basics * Establish good work habits within the Microsoft Office suite to set yourself up for success * Find the information you're looking for with short chapter openers that point you in the right direction Office 2016 For Seniors For Dummies is essential to keeping your mind sharp and your computer skills on the cutting edge!!

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Office 2016 For Seniors For Dummies®

Published by: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 111 River Street, Hoboken, NJ 07030-5774, www.wiley.com

Copyright © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, New Jersey

Media and software compilation copyright © 2015 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

Published simultaneously in Canada

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Library of Congress Control Number: 2015950349

ISBN 978-1-119-07749-7 (pbk); ISBN 978-1-119-07752-7 (ebk); ISBN 978-1-119-07738-1 (ebk)

Office 2016 For Seniors For Dummies®

Visit www.dummies.com/cheatsheet/office2016forseniors to view this book's cheat sheet.

Table of Contents

Cover

Introduction

About This Book

Foolish Assumptions

How This Book Is Organized

Conventions Used in This Book

Time to Get Started!

Part I: Getting Started with Office 2016

Chapter 1: The Two-Dollar Tour

Start an Office Application

Start a New Document

Explore the Office Ribbon and Tabs

Understand the File Menu (Backstage View)

Create a Document

Type Text

Insert a Picture

Move Around in a Document

Select Content

Zoom In and Out

Change the View

Chapter 2: Exploring the Common Features of Office 2016

Edit Text

Move and Copy Content

Choose Fonts and Font Sizes

Apply Text Formatting

Use the Mini Toolbar

Work with Themes

Check Your Spelling and Grammar

Chapter 3: Opening, Saving, and Printing Files

Save Your Work

Open a Previously Saved File

Change the File Listing View

Email Your Work to Others

Share Your Work in Other Formats

Print Your Work

Recover Lost Work

Part II: Word

Chapter 4: Composing Your Thoughtsin Word

Examine the Word Interface

Move Around and Select Text

Choose Paper Size and Orientation

Set Margins

Select the Right Screen View

Align and Indent Paragraphs

Change Line Spacing

Create Bulleted and Numbered Lists

Chapter 5: Dressing Up Your Documents

Apply Styles and Style Sets

Insert Photos

Size and Format a Picture

Position a Picture

Add a Page Border

Apply a Background Color to a Page

Create Tables

Format a Table

Chapter 6: Taking Word to the Next Level

Number the Pages

Use Headers and Footers

Insert Cover Pages and Other Building Blocks

Print an Envelope

Perform a Mail Merge

Insert the Date and Time

Part III: Excel

Chapter 7: Creating Basic Spreadsheets in Excel

Understand Excel’s Unique Features

Get Familiar with Spreadsheet Structure

Move the Cell Cursor

Select a Range

Type and Edit Cell Contents

Insert and Delete Rows, Columns, and Cells

Work with Worksheets

Chapter 8: Doing the Math: Formulas and Functions

Learn How Formulas Are Structured

Write Formulas That Reference Cells

Move and Copy Cell Content

Reference a Cell on Another Sheet

Understand Functions

Take a Tour of Some Basic Functions

Explore Financial Functions

Chapter 9: Creating Visual Interest with Formatting and Charts

Adjust Row Height and Column Width

Wrap Text in a Cell

Apply Gridlines or Borders

Apply Fill Color

Format Text in Cells

Format the Spreadsheet as a Whole

Create a Basic Chart

Identify the Parts of a Chart

Format a Chart

Chapter 10: Using Excel as a Database

Understand Databases

Prepare a List for a Mail Merge

Store Data in a Table

Sort a Table

Filter Data in a Table

Split a Column’s Content

Merge the Contents of Columns

Part IV: Outlook

Chapter 11: Managing Email with Outlook

Set Up Outlook for the First Time

Set Up Additional Mail Accounts

Troubleshoot Mail Setup Problems

Take a Quick Tour of Outlook’s Mail Feature

Receive and Read Your Mail

View Photos and Other Attachments

Reply to a Message

Compose a Message

Attach a File to a Message

Avoid Frauds, Scams, and Viruses

Chapter 12: Managing the Details: Contacts, Notes, and Tasks

Store Contact Information

Edit and Delete Contacts

Choose How the Contact List Appears

Use the Contacts List

Create Notes

Categorize Notes

Use Tasks and the To-Do List

Update the Status of a Task

Set a Task Reminder

Chapter 13: Your Busy Life: Using the Calendar

View Your Calendar

Create and Delete a Calendar Event

Set an Event to Recur

Configure Event Reminders

Add Holidays

Print a Hard Copy of Your Calendar

Part V: PowerPoint

Chapter 14: Getting Started with PowerPoint

Explore the PowerPoint Interface

Work with PowerPoint Files

Understand PowerPoint Views

Create New Slides

Use Slide Placeholders

Turn Text AutoFit Off or On

Change Slide Layouts

Move or Resize Slide Content

Manually Place Text on a Slide

Navigate and Select Text

Select Content

Chapter 15: Dressing Up Your Presentations

Understand and Apply Themes and Variants

Change the Presentation Colors

Edit Slide Masters

Format Text Boxes and Placeholders

Insert Pictures

Create a Photo Album Presentation

Chapter 16: Adding Movement and Sound

Animate Objects on a Slide

Add Slide Transition Effects

Set Slides to Automatically Advance

Add a Soundtrack

Chapter 17: Presenting the Show

Display a Slide Show Onscreen

Use the Slide Show Tools

Print Copies of a Presentation

Package a Presentation for Distribution

Make a Video of the Presentation

Appendix A: Customizing Office Applications

Customize the Quick Access Toolbar

Customize the Status Bar

Set Program Options

Set Outlook Options

About the Author

Cheat Sheet

Advertisement Page

Connect with Dummies

End User License Agreement

Guide

Cover

Table of Contents

Begin Reading

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Introduction

Microsoft Office 2016 is by far the most popular suite of productivity applications in the world, and with good reason. Its applications are powerful enough for business and professional use, and yet easy enough that a beginner can catch on to the basics with just a few simple lessons.

If you’re new to Office 2016, this book can help you separate the essential features you need from the obscure and more sophisticated ones you don’t. For the four major Office applications I cover in this book — Word, Excel, Outlook, and PowerPoint — I walk you through the most important and common features, showing you how to put them to work for projects in your job, everyday life, and home.

About This Book

This book is written specifically for mature people like you, who are relatively new to using Office applications and want to master the basics. In this book, I tried to take into account the types of activities that might interest you, such as investment planning, personal finance, email, and documents and presentations that you might need to prepare for work, clubs, volunteer opportunities, or other organizations that you participate in.

Foolish Assumptions

This book assumes that you can start your computer and use the keyboard and mouse (or whatever device moves the pointer onscreen).

If you’re using a computer for the first time, Computers For Seniors For Dummies shows you the essential skills that all computer applications use.

Office 2016 runs on Windows 10 (the newest version of Windows), Windows 8, and Windows 7 computer operating systems, so I assume you’re using one of these. The examples in this book show Office 2016 running in Windows 10, but Office works mostly the same on all operating systems.

How This Book Is Organized

This book is divided into several handy parts to help you find what you need and skip stuff you don’t use.

Part I: Getting Started with Office

In this first part of the book, I explain some basics that apply to all the Office 2016 applications generically, such as saving, opening, and printing files. I also show you some features that all Office 2016 applications have in common, such as selecting and formatting text, using the Clipboard, and applying formatting themes.

Part II: Word

This part explores the most popular application in the Office suite, Microsoft Word. This word processing program helps you create letters, reports, envelopes, and myriad other text-based documents. You’ll see how to format text, change page size and orientation, insert graphics, and more.

Part III: Excel

In this part of the book, you can read about Excel, the Office spreadsheet application. See how to enter text and numbers in a worksheet, write formulas and functions that perform calculations, and format worksheets attractively. You can also find out how to create charts and use Excel to store simple databases.

Part IV: Outlook

Outlook is the email, contact management, and calendar application in Office. In this part of the book, discover how to send and receive email in Outlook, and also how to use Outlook to track appointments and store your personal address book.

Part V: PowerPoint

In this part of the book, I show you the basics of PowerPoint, the Office presentation application. You can read how to create presentations that include text and graphics; create cool animation and transition effects; add a musical soundtrack; and share your presentation with others, either in a live-action show or on CD.

The Appendix shows some simple ways to customize how Office applications work when you start them.

Conventions Used in This Book

This book uses certain conventions to help you find your way:

Wherever possible, I use labels on figures to point out what you should notice on them. These labels reinforce something I say in the text or contain extra tips and hints.

When you have to type something, I put it in

bold type

.

For menu and Ribbon commands, I use the ⇒ symbol to separate the steps. For example, if I say to choose Home ⇒ Clipboard ⇒ Copy, click the Home tab, find the Clipboard group, and then click the Copy button in that group. In most cases, I provide the group name as part of the path to help you find the command more quickly. (Each tab has a lot of different commands on it.)

Tip icons point out extra features, special insights and helps, or things to look out for.

Warning icons indicate potential problems to avoid, problems that are difficult to fix or make bad things happen.

Time to Get Started!

This is your book; use it how you want. You can start at the beginning and read it straight through, or you can hop to whatever chapter or topic you want. For those of you who are pretty new to computers, you might want to start at the beginning. If you’re new to Office, the beginning part will give you a good foundation on what features work similarly in all the programs.

Part I

Getting Started with Office 2016

Visit www.dummies.com for more great content online.

Chapter 1

The Two-Dollar Tour

Get ready to . . .

Start an Office Application

Start a New Document

Explore the Office Ribbon and Tabs

Understand the File Menu (Backstage View)

Create a Document

Type Text

Insert a Picture

Move Around in a Document

Select Content

Zoom In and Out

Change the View

Step right up for a tour of Microsoft Office, the most popular suite of applications in the world!

Here are some of the things you can do with Office:

Write letters, reports, and newsletters.

Track bank account balances and investments.

Create presentations to support speeches and meetings.

Send and receive email.

The Office suite consists of several very powerful applications (programs), each with its own features and interface, but the applications also have a lot in common with one another. Learning about one application gives you a head start in learning the others.

In this chapter (and Chapter 2), I take you on a quick tour of some of the features that multiple Office applications have in common, including the tabbed Ribbon area. I also show you how to insert text and graphics in the various applications, and how to move around and zoom in and out.

In these first few chapters, I use Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, and Excel as the example applications because all of them work more or less the same way: They let you open and save data files that contain your work on various projects. Microsoft Outlook works a bit differently, as I show you in Chapters 11 through 13.

This book shows Microsoft Office in the Windows 10 operating system. Office works the same way in Windows 7 and Windows 8 except for minor differences in opening the applications and working with files. I’ll explain any differences as we go along.

Start an Office Application

The steps for starting an Office application differ depending on which version of Windows you have:

Windows 10:

Click the Start button, and then click All Apps. Scroll down to the M section, and click Microsoft Office 16. Then click the desired Office application.

Windows 8.1:

From the Start screen, click the down arrow at the bottom and then locate and click the application you want. Or, from the Start screen, begin typing the first few letter of the application’s name and then click it in the search results.

Windows 7:

Click the Start button, and click All Programs. Click the Microsoft Office 2016 folder, and then click the Office application you want to start.

Start a New Document

When you open Word, Excel, or PowerPoint, a Start screen appears, containing a list of recently used documents and thumbnail images of templates you can use to start new documents. To start a new blank document (which you’ll want to do in order to follow along with this chapter), you can press the Esc key, or you can click the Blank template. The template has a slightly different name depending on the application; in Word it is called Blank document, in Excel it’s Blank workbook, and so on. Figure 1-1 shows the Start screen for Microsoft Word, for example.

Figure 1-1

To create an additional new blank document after the application is already up-and-running, press Ctrl+N at any time.

Office 2010 and earlier started a blank document automatically in Word, Excel, and PowerPoint, without having to go through a Start screen. If you want that old-style behavior back, click File and then click Options. On the General page, scroll down to the bottom and clear the Show the Start Screen When This Application Starts check box.

Explore the Office Ribbon and Tabs

All Office 2016 applications have a common system of navigation called the Ribbon, which is a tabbed bar across the top of the application window. Each tab is like a page of buttons. You click different tabs to access different sets of buttons and features.

Figure 1-2 shows the Ribbon in Microsoft Word, with the Home tab displayed. Within a tab, buttons are organized into groups. In Figure 1-2, the Home tab’s groups are Clipboard, Font, Paragraph, Styles, and Editing.

Figure 1-2

Each Office application has a set of tabs for the tasks it performs. For example, Word has a Mailings tab that holds the commands for doing mail merges. Excel has a Formulas tab that holds the commands for setting up calculations.

You might find tabs that were added by third-party (non-Microsoft) software. For example, if you have a program called Adobe Acrobat installed, you might have an Acrobat tab in each of the Office applications.

The buttons and controls on the tabs operate in different ways. Figure 1-3 points out some examples on Word’s Home tab.

Figure 1-3

On/off toggles:

When the button is selected (it turns orange), the feature is on. Each time you click the button, it switches between on and off.

Command buttons:

When you click the button, the command executes. If you click a command button again, the command repeats.

Connected button sets: In connected sets of buttons, selecting a button deselects (cancels) the previous selection in the set.

For example, Figure 1-3 has four buttons in the bottom row for paragraph alignment. The leftmost one is selected; if you click one of the others, it’s automatically canceled.

Menu buttons:

Buttons with arrows on them open menus or color palettes.

Galleries:

A

gallery

is like a permanently open menu or palette; click a selection directly from a gallery. Most galleries also have a More button that shows more choices.

You can hover the mouse pointer over a button to see a pop-up box, called a ScreenTip, which tells the button’s name and/or purpose.

With some buttons that contain arrows, you can click anywhere on the button face — directly on the arrow or not — to open the menu or palette (an array of colored squares from which you can choose a color). With others, the button face and the arrow are separate clickable areas. Clicking the arrow opens the menu, but clicking the button face applies whatever setting was most recently chosen from the menu.

To tell the difference between the two types of menu buttons, point the mouse at the button. If the button face and the arrow are different colors or if there is a thin line between them, it’s the type where you have to click directly on the arrow to get the menu. If there’s no separation, you can click anywhere on the button.

In the bottom-right corner of many of the groups is a small square with an arrow. Clicking this square (called a dialog box launcher) opens a dialog box related to that group. For example, the one for the Paragraph group in Figure 1-3 opens the Paragraph dialog box, which contains controls for every button in that group plus more options not available on the Ribbon.

Not sure which tab contains the command you want, or what the command is called? The Tell me what you want to do… box (shown in Figure 1-2) enables you to ask questions in plain English. Just type your question in the box and press Enter to see a list of relevant commands, and then click the one you want to issue that command.

When you resize the application’s window so the window is narrower than normal, or when you run the application on a computer that has low-resolution video settings, the controls on the Ribbon compress (squeeze together). Some of the groups turn into single buttons with drop-down lists for accessing the individual controls within that group. For example, in Figure 1-4, most of the groups are compressed, and one of the groups has been opened as a drop-down list.

Figure 1-4

Above the main part of the Ribbon is a small toolbar called the Quick Access toolbar. You can add buttons for frequently used commands here (as many as you can fit). To add a button, right-click any control from any tab and choose Add to Quick Access Toolbar, as shown in Figure 1-5. To change the position of the Quick Access Toolbar, right-click it and choose Show the Quick Access Toolbar Below the Ribbon (or Above, if it’s already below).

Figure 1-5

You can also customize the Ribbon itself, but that’s beyond the scope of this book. If you want to experiment with it on your own, choose File ⇒ Options and click Customize Ribbon.

Understand the File Menu (Backstage View)

Clicking the File tab opens the File menu, also known as Backstage view. Backstage View provides access to commands that have to do with the data file you are working with — things like saving, opening, printing, mailing, and checking its properties. The File tab is a different color in each application. In Word, for example, it is blue. To leave Backstage view, click some other tab or press the Esc key.

Backstage View lists top-level categories at the left; click one to see the commands available. The content to the right of the category list depends on what you have chosen.

When a document is open and you enter Backstage View, the Info category appears. It provides information about the current document, and offers commands for protecting the document, checking for issues, and managing versions. In addition, if the document uses a different file format than Word 2016, a Convert button appears, enabling you to upgrade the document format. See Figure 1-6.

Figure 1-6

Some of the other categories, when selected, make additional commands or options appear to the right of the list. For example, in Figure 1-7, you can see that when Share is selected (in Word), a submenu of commands appears to the right, along with buttons for specific operations.

Figure 1-7

The bottom-most command is Options, which opens a dialog box from which you can control the settings for the application.

Create a Document

In Word, Excel, and PowerPoint, the Start screen appears when you start the application, and from there you can create a new document (or workbook, or presentation) by pressing the Esc key or clicking the Blank template. You can then just start typing or inserting content into it.

You can also create additional new documents. An easy shortcut to do so is to press Ctrl+N. You can also choose File ⇒ New. That latter method has the advantage of opening a selection of templates you can use to jumpstart your work if you don’t want a totally blank document to start with. Choose one of the templates that appears, or click in the Search for online templates box, type a keyword, and press Enter to look for a certain kind of template. Let’s forego the templates for now, though, and keep working in this chapter with a blank document.

Type Text

Putting text on the page (or onscreen) is a little different in each of the three major Office applications: Word, Excel, and PowerPoint.

Word:

The main work area of the program is a blank slate on which you can type directly. Just click in the work area and start typing!

Chapter 2

explains more about typing and editing text. See

Figure 1-8

.

Excel:

The work area is divided into a grid of cells. Click any cell to make it active, and type to place text into it, as in

Figure 1-9

.

Chapter 7

shows how to work with text in Excel cells.

PowerPoint:

The work area is divided into three panes. The largest one, in the center, is where you insert content on a slide.

If a slide has a text placeholder on it, you can click in the placeholder and type, as in

Figure 1-10

.

If there isn’t a placeholder on the slide, or if the placeholder doesn’t meet your needs, you can place a text box on the slide manually. (That’s covered in

Chapter 11

.)

Figure 1-8

Figure 1-9

Figure 1-10

Insert a Picture

All Office applications accept various types of pictures. Here’s how to insert a photo (or other graphic file) into Word, Excel, or PowerPoint:

Click the Insert tab.

Click the Pictures button. The Insert Picture dialog box opens. See

Figure 1-11

. The default location that opens is the Pictures folder for the user currently signed into Windows.

Select the picture you want to insert. (You might need to change to a different location. That’s covered in

Chapter 3

.)

Click the Insert button.

Figure 1-11

The preceding steps apply to picture files, such as images from a digital camera or that you downloaded from the Internet. There are lots of other graphic types, such as online images, WordArt (stylized text), and drawn lines and shapes. Each of these has its own procedure for insertion. Later chapters discuss these in more detail.

You can drag and drop pictures directly from File Explorer into any document in an Office application.

Move Around in a Document

As you add content in one of the applications, there might be so much content that you can’t see it all onscreen at once. You might need to scroll through the document to view different parts of it.

The simplest way to move around is by using the scroll bars with your mouse:

In Excel, a vertical (up and down) and a horizontal (left to right) scroll bar are always available.

In Word and PowerPoint, the vertical scroll bar is always available. The horizontal scroll bar disappears if there is no undisplayed text from side-to-side.

Figure 1-12 shows several ways to use a scroll bar:

Click the arrow at the end of a scroll bar to scroll the display slowly in the direction of the arrow (a small amount each time you click).

Drag the box in the scroll bar to scroll quickly.

Click in the empty space on the bar to one side or the other of the scroll box to move one screenful at a time in that direction.

Figure 1-12

The size of the scroll box (the blank rectangle you drag in the scroll bar) indicates how much content you can’t see at the moment. For example, in Figure 1-12, the scroll box occupies about one-half of the scroll bar; this means that there is about one screenful of undisplayed content. In a very large spreadsheet, the scroll box might be very small.

You can also move around by using keyboard shortcuts. As you gain experience with the applications, you might find using keyboard shortcuts more convenient than using the scroll bar. Chapter 4 lists shortcuts for Word, Chapter 7 lists shortcuts for Excel, and Chapter 14 lists shortcuts for PowerPoint.

Select Content

Selecting content is an essential skill for any Office application. Many commands in Office applications apply to whatever text or graphics you select. For example, to make some text bold, select it first, and then click the Bold button. Figure 1-13 shows some selected text.

Figure 1-13

To select text in Word or PowerPoint, you can either

Drag the mouse pointer across it (holding down the left mouse button)

or

Click where you want to start and then hold down Shift as you press the arrow keys to extend the selection.

When text is selected, its background changes color. The color depends on the color scheme in use; with the default color scheme, selected text is blue.

In Excel, you usually want to select entire cells rather than individual bits of text; when the cell is selected, any formatting or other commands that you issue applies to everything in that cell. To select a cell, click it. You can extend the selection to multiple cells by dragging across them or by holding down Shift and pressing the arrow keys.

You can also select text by using keyboard shortcuts. Chapter 4 lists shortcuts for Word, Chapter 7 lists shortcuts for Excel, and Chapter 14 lists shortcuts for PowerPoint.

To select a graphic, click it with the mouse. Selection handles (white squares) appear around the outside of it. Figure 1-14 shows a selected graphic in Word.

Figure 1-14

When a graphic is selected, you can do any of the following to it:

Move it.

Position the mouse pointer on the graphic (not on the border) and drag.

Copy it.

Hold down the Ctrl key while you move it.

Resize it

. Position the mouse pointer on one of the selection handles and drag.

Delete it.

Press the Delete key.

Rotate it.

Drag the rotation handle, which is the circular arrow above the graphic.

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